Wes Studi, Dale Dickey are reuniting high school sweethearts in ‘Love Song’

“A Love Song” teams two distinguished veterans, Wes Studi, who’s 74, and Dale Dickey, 60, to wonder if high school sweethearts from way back could reunite today.
Dickey’s Faye is parked with her small trailer next to a lake at a Colorado camping site, anxiously waiting.  Not until this “Song” is well underway does Studi’s Lito show up with his dog.
Surviving, certainly single partners, they’re meeting to see what might happen.
“These two are very much almost childlike in their experience of getting back together again,” Studi said. “Almost like you’re in class and the boys pull the girls’ pigtails or something.
“Almost all of us have experienced that one way or another over the years. It’s really not that hard to get into if you’re willing to go back into your past and admit to yourself that you weren’t always as smooth as you are today.”
“After COVID, everyone can relate to Faye who is so isolated in this routine of depression,” Dickey said. “Hopefully Lito shows up and will help her find a way forward because, ultimately, it’s just about love and connection. About moving on, being at peace with yourself and enjoying the beauty of nature.”
Written, produced, co-written and directed by Max Walker-Silverman (his debut), “Love Song” often lets a silent Faye simply observe the wondrous landscape.  Faye meets a lesbian couple who camp nearby and have their own romantic issues and manages the bizarre arrival of a silent sextet with engine trouble who seem to have just stepped out of a Buster Keaton classic.
Although Studi and Dickey lived in the same house during filming, as they dreamed up Lita and Faye’s history and background, “We decided not to discuss our characters too intimately about the past 40 years,” Studi said.  “In part, because we wanted it to be spontaneous and organic and seem real on camera.”
It can be risky for an experienced actor to work with a first-time filmmaker.  “To me it’s exciting to work with young writers and directors. They’re so passionate,” Dickey said. “I just instantly trusted Max from the letter he wrote me and then we talked.
“He had studied acting years ago in theater and then moved to film school so he knows how to talk to actors.
“I like a strong director,” she added. “I was terrified — because of the size of the role and the sizable silence.  Could I handle it? He just guided me the whole way. So I was thrilled. He’s a great talent.”